Insomniacs Anonymous 4–24-15

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You’re awake. Instead of writing the Great American Novel—or even a mediocre one—you’re reading our blog. Okay, then. We offer a topic; you respond. Let your fellow writers inspire you, and return to that manuscript refreshed.

How do you maintain your writing schedule when the warm days of spring beckon you outdoors?

Practical Prompt 4-22-15

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

When characters speak, they say things. They don’t “smile” them or “grin” them. Said is best, but yelled, shouted or cried are appropriate in moderation. Go through your novel to make sure your dialogue isn’t attributed to gestures.

Night Owl vs. Lark

Megan Norris Jones

Megan Norris Jones

I’ve been having trouble finding time to write lately. It’s a common problem—one I’ve solved before and will probably have to solve again as life changes and what used to work works no longer. There’s just not enough time for everything I need and want to do. But writing is important, so I’m setting aside time for it.

But what time? I can’t seem to lay claim to any time during the day on a regular basis, so I might have to start treating daytime writing as a lucky bonus. That leaves me either getting up early to write or staying up late to do it. Continue reading

Insomniacs Anonymous 4–17-15

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You’re awake. Instead of writing the Great American Novel—or even a mediocre one—you’re reading our blog. Okay, then. We offer a topic; you respond. Let your fellow writers inspire you, and return to that manuscript refreshed.

As a reader, how important is it to you to have the author give physical descriptions of the major characters?  Does it help you get a feel for the story or is it just extraneous information that you ignore?

Practical Prompt 4-15-15

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

Be deliberate in choosing the season of your story. Everything from holidays to weather can develop your plot, characterization or setting.