Practical Prompt 11-19-14

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

Is your dialogue an information dump? If you remove the dialogue from a scene, does that change the plot? If so, you might be giving too much information via dialogue. Try giving the same information through narrative.

When the scope is too broad . . .

Alicia Finney

Alicia Finney

I love food. And cooking. Let’s not forget cooking, and it’s in cooking that I found some inspiration recently. Or more accurately, I had some inspiration that was brought into focus.

By balsamic vinegar.

Wait. Bear with me. Continue reading

Insomniacs Anonymous 11-14-14

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You’re awake. Instead of writing the Great American Novel—or even a mediocre one—you’re reading our blog. Okay, then. We offer a topic; you respond. Let your fellow writers inspire you, and return to that manuscript refreshed.

When you read a book, do you read it to learn how to write better or just to enjoy the story?

Practical Prompt 11-12-14

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

Take all the dialogue tags out of your story, and see if you can tell which character is talking by his or her voice.

Where Does The Time Go?

Stacey Kite

Stacey Kite

Since both my novel and my picture book dummy are progressing at the pace of geriatric snails, I came up with a systematic plan to become more efficient, which I outlined in my last post.

Step one was to log my time to find out where I really spent it, versus where I wanted to be spending it.

Step two, the object of this post, is to analyze the results from step one. Continue reading