Practical Prompt 8-28-14

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

Prompt: If you are writing in first person, consider how many times you use the word “I.” Are there ways you could restructure sentences to avoid overusing it?

Insomniacs Anonymous 8-26-14

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You’re awake. Instead of writing the Great American Novel—or even a mediocre one—you’re reading our blog. Okay, then. We offer a topic; you respond. Let your fellow writers inspire you, and return to that manuscript refreshed.

Question: When does it seem impossible for you to write?

An introvert walks into a writer’s conference …

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

In a few weeks, I will be attending the SCBWI Mid-South conference—my first real conference since I decided to seriously attempt to be a writer. There are many things I’m excited about: a weekend to write, learn and “be” uninterrupted, a chance to hang out with friends from my writing group.

And then, there are the things I’m anxious about: being away from my family and the events I’ll miss, having someone shred my chapter in my critique Continue reading

Practical Prompt 8-21-14

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

Prompt: Do you include unnecessary action in your story? The advantage of fiction is that you get to skip the boring bits. Read over your last scene and eliminate insignificant steps. We don’t need to see your character wake up in the morning if nothing happens until lunch. Same thing for the bus ride, if nothing happens along the route. Cut those sentences, paragraphs, and scenes

Insomniacs Anonymous 8-19-14

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You’re awake. Instead of writing the Great American Novel—or even a mediocre one—you’re reading our blog. Okay, then. We offer a topic; you respond. Let your fellow writers inspire you, and return to that manuscript refreshed.

Question: Do you write better at a certain time of day? When and why do you think you’re more productive during that time?